Launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis (NASA Mission STS-115) from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 9 September 2006. Taken by NASA/JSC WB-57 High Altitude Research aircraft. —- Source: snopes.com

Launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis (NASA Mission STS-115) from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 9 September 2006. Taken by NASA/JSC WB-57 High Altitude Research aircraft. —- Source: snopes.com

(Source: amypink, via garp)

audiovision:

NASA gave Dan Winters premiere access to its space program because he has photography down to a science.

Winters meticulously set up his cameras within 700 feet of the final launches of space shuttles Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour, which is no small feat given the massive vibrations caused by the spaceward bound blasts. He also got access to iconic space memorabilia such as Neil Armstrong’s lunar suit, pictured above.

See more images from his series “Last Launch” on KPCC’s AudioVision, and, if you’re in L.A., you can see his exhibit at the Fahey/Klein Gallery from July 11th - August 31st.

2012 September 2: Atlas V rocket climbing through early morning skies over Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, USA. Snug inside the rocket’s Centaur upper stage were NASA’s twin Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), now in separate orbits within planet Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts. Reflected in the Turn Basin from a vantage point about three miles from Space Launch Complex 41, the scene was captured in a composite of two exposures. One highlights the dramatic play of launch pad lighting, clouds, and sky. A subsequent three minute long exposure records the rocket’s fiery trail. While most spacecraft try to avoid the radiation belts, named for their discoverer James Van Allen, RBSP’s mission will be to explore their dynamic and harsh conditions.
Photo by Mike Killian.

2012 September 2: Atlas V rocket climbing through early morning skies over Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, USA. Snug inside the rocket’s Centaur upper stage were NASA’s twin Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), now in separate orbits within planet Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts. Reflected in the Turn Basin from a vantage point about three miles from Space Launch Complex 41, the scene was captured in a composite of two exposures. One highlights the dramatic play of launch pad lighting, clouds, and sky. A subsequent three minute long exposure records the rocket’s fiery trail. While most spacecraft try to avoid the radiation belts, named for their discoverer James Van Allen, RBSP’s mission will be to explore their dynamic and harsh conditions.

Photo by Mike Killian.

Suddenly, this isn’t such a bad idea…

Suddenly, this isn’t such a bad idea…

(Source: reddit.com)

Timing

Timing

(Source: thezigzagger.com, via scinerds)

wilwheaton:

Felicia Day has an epic series debuting today on YouTube: Dragon Age II: Redemption.
She worked harder on this series than I’ve ever seen anyone work on anything, ever, and it shows: it’s just incredible.
Because it’s at YouTube, though, the comments are… not exactly insightful or (in many cases) even relevant to the video.
I want to reach through the internet and punch the idiots who make these comments, but instead, I’m going to find a little peace and perspective at XKCD.

wilwheaton:

Felicia Day has an epic series debuting today on YouTube: Dragon Age II: Redemption.

She worked harder on this series than I’ve ever seen anyone work on anything, ever, and it shows: it’s just incredible.

Because it’s at YouTube, though, the comments are… not exactly insightful or (in many cases) even relevant to the video.

I want to reach through the internet and punch the idiots who make these comments, but instead, I’m going to find a little peace and perspective at XKCD.

(Source: xkcd.com)

Space shuttle’s trail, just minutes after taking off for Atlantis’ final flight

Space shuttle’s trail, just minutes after taking off for Atlantis’ final flight

(Source: The Huffington Post)